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Welcome to Red Slime, the personal journal of Orange Claymore. This site contains work I have done over the years, audio and video. Things i like to do are as followed; skateboarding, computers, video games, listening to bad music, guns and creating music (check noise section). I also pass live feeds of interesting and related topics. Explore and have fun.

UPDATE: The new 404_Error band archive site and my old project, bland officer, is now active on the Noise page!

Every Ikea Catalog Cover Since 1951

Every Ikea Catalog Cover Since 1951

It’s that time of year: If you’re one of the hundreds of millions people on Ikea’s mailing list, you probably recently received a thick square of super-thin paper filled with (mostly rendered) products. Ikea has been sending these babies out for more than six decades—and you can follow the evolution of popular design just by looking at them.

With the help of Ikea’s own copywriters, the committed Ikea fans over at HomeDesigning pulled together 63 years of Ikea catalog covers, dating back to the first catalog ever sent out in 1951. It’s fascinating (and pretty hilarious, at moments) to see the classic Ikea tropes evolve over time. There was definitely a dark period in the late 1960s and early 70s, but just a few years later, Ikea had ditched the overstuffed pee-yellow couches for classic designs like its Alvar Aalto-inspired Poang chair, which is still with us today.

Check out the covers below—or head over to their post for more.

Every Ikea Catalog Cover Since 1951

Every Ikea Catalog Cover Since 1951

Every Ikea Catalog Cover Since 1951

Every Ikea Catalog Cover Since 1951

Every Ikea Catalog Cover Since 1951

Every Ikea Catalog Cover Since 1951

Every Ikea Catalog Cover Since 1951

Every Ikea Catalog Cover Since 1951

Every Ikea Catalog Cover Since 1951

Every Ikea Catalog Cover Since 1951

Every Ikea Catalog Cover Since 1951

Every Ikea Catalog Cover Since 1951

Every Ikea Catalog Cover Since 1951

Every Ikea Catalog Cover Since 1951

Every Ikea Catalog Cover Since 1951

Every Ikea Catalog Cover Since 1951

Every Ikea Catalog Cover Since 1951

Every Ikea Catalog Cover Since 1951

Every Ikea Catalog Cover Since 1951

Every Ikea Catalog Cover Since 1951

Every Ikea Catalog Cover Since 1951

Every Ikea Catalog Cover Since 1951

Every Ikea Catalog Cover Since 1951

Every Ikea Catalog Cover Since 1951

Every Ikea Catalog Cover Since 1951

Every Ikea Catalog Cover Since 1951

Every Ikea Catalog Cover Since 1951

Every Ikea Catalog Cover Since 1951

Every Ikea Catalog Cover Since 1951

Every Ikea Catalog Cover Since 1951

Every Ikea Catalog Cover Since 1951

Every Ikea Catalog Cover Since 1951

Every Ikea Catalog Cover Since 1951

Every Ikea Catalog Cover Since 1951

Every Ikea Catalog Cover Since 1951

Every Ikea Catalog Cover Since 1951

Every Ikea Catalog Cover Since 1951

Every Ikea Catalog Cover Since 1951

Every Ikea Catalog Cover Since 1951

Every Ikea Catalog Cover Since 1951

Every Ikea Catalog Cover Since 1951

Every Ikea Catalog Cover Since 1951

Every Ikea Catalog Cover Since 1951

Every Ikea Catalog Cover Since 1951

Every Ikea Catalog Cover Since 1951

Every Ikea Catalog Cover Since 1951

Every Ikea Catalog Cover Since 1951

Every Ikea Catalog Cover Since 1951

Every Ikea Catalog Cover Since 1951

Every Ikea Catalog Cover Since 1951

Every Ikea Catalog Cover Since 1951

Every Ikea Catalog Cover Since 1951

Every Ikea Catalog Cover Since 1951

Every Ikea Catalog Cover Since 1951

Every Ikea Catalog Cover Since 1951

Every Ikea Catalog Cover Since 1951

Every Ikea Catalog Cover Since 1951

Every Ikea Catalog Cover Since 1951

Every Ikea Catalog Cover Since 1951

Every Ikea Catalog Cover Since 1951

Every Ikea Catalog Cover Since 1951

Every Ikea Catalog Cover Since 1951

Every Ikea Catalog Cover Since 1951

Every Ikea Catalog Cover Since 1951

Every Ikea Catalog Cover Since 1951

Source Article from http://feeds.gawker.com/~r/gizmodo/full/~3/G0185no7D58/every-ikea-catalog-cover-from-the-past-63-years-1628121028

MSN Messenger will finally, definitely be dead in October

Microsoft retiring Messenger on March 15th, wants you to use Skype instead

Microsoft’s 15-year-old MSN Messaging service will soon be a part of computer lore. It has been shut down in most places for over a year, but Microsoft kept it running in China where it was still quite popular. However, with the advent of Tencent’s QQ, Line and other services, Redmond recently emailed Chinese users (on their Hotmail accounts, naturally) that the service would ride into the sunset on October 31st. To give you an idea of how old it is, the service was created in 1999 by Microsoft to compete against AOL’s AIM chat service (disclaimer: AOL is Engadget’s parent company). However, we doubt too many users will get misty-eyed about its demise — the only nostalgia we have is how difficult it was to get rid of.















Source Article from http://www.engadget.com/2014/08/29/msn-messenger-discontinued-china/?ncid=rss_truncated

Extrinsic Motivation: Daisy Kite Airborne Wind Turbine

6725361404677502770

Got another THP entry for ya’ll that didn’t quite make the cut, but is worth sharing. This time we are featuring an airborne wind turbine that, as the project description states, ‘can harvest strong and expansive wind safely and efficiently.’

Ram air kites spin a parachute that in turn transfers torque that can be captured on the ground. In a true hacker spirit way, the rig developed by [Rod] utilizes bike wheels and rollerblade wheels in the design. This homemade generator needs a lot of space to be deployed, but it looks like a nice solution to airborne energy harvesting. [Rod] goes over the specifications for the project throughout the build logs on the Hackaday.io page and includes a couple of video describing how it was created and showing what happens when it is released into the air currents outside. Diagrams and models of the open source airborne wind energy generation device are also included.

Below are a few of his videos. Watch them over, and let us know what you think.


SpaceWrencherThis project is an official entry to The Hackaday Prize that sadly didn’t make the quarterfinal selection. It’s still a great project, and worthy of a Hackaday post on its own.

 

Description Video:

Demo Video:

Source Article from http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/hackaday/LgoM/~3/JdxeVY9zpr8/

Starbucks Pumpkin Spice Lattes™ have no pumpkin in them

Starbucks Pumpkin Spice Lattes™ have no pumpkin in them

Starbucks is rolling out pumpkin spice lattes, starting with an early access option that starts today. This means it’s the time of year for everyone’s favorite overpriced seasonal beverage. This doesn’t mean we’ll be adding extra pumpkin to our diet, because Starbucks Pumpkin Spice Lattes™, despite the name, contain no pumpkin.

Look, I am not a Pumpkin Spice Hater. I am pretty much the exact type of person you’d think likes the damned things. I would gladly guzzle a bucket of Starbucks’ devilishly tasty autumn juice. I also love Sephora and Sex and the City (am mix of Carrie and Miranda, thanks for asking). I’m the person twirling around in a tweed jacket remarking on how CRISP it feels outside as I sip on my drink.

This is not a screed borne of condescension, but of truth-seeking.

We are not warming our hands on a product containing even a lick of orange gourd goodness. Starbucks hasn’t yet replied to my request for a complete ingredient list, but here’s what we know. Vani Hari, who blogs at Food Babe, recently pieced together a semi-complete ingredient list by looking at what is in the individual components on the Starbucks website. As mentioned: zero pumpkin. Instead, we get caramel color level IV, which is made with ammonia and is gross enough that Starbucks is saying it plans to phase it out following Hari’s complaints. There’s also a shit ton of sugar, and vegans who order theirs with soy will be sad to know the pumpkin spice mix itself contains condensed milk.

Many of Starbucks’ drinks are unhealthy, and it’s not like the PSL™ is unique in the way the name does not match up with the ingredients. I’m guessing there’s no gingerbread in the Gingerbread latte, and there’s sure as hell no Oprah in the Teavana® Oprah Chai. But the PSL™ has attained such a devoted fan base that the fundamental dishonesty behind the name is especially rankling. Sure, Starbucks will admit that the drink is pumpkin-free. But it still puts the word “pumpkin” front and center, and it really shouldn’t. It shouldn’t even want to. Have you tasted raw pumpkin? It tastes like dirt, not Halloween. Starbucks has invented a superior flavor, which they should celebrate. They just shouldn’t masquerade it as remotely related to pumpkins.

Here are some more appropriate suggestions:

1) Fall spice latte

2) Autumn spice latte

3) White girl latte

4) We’re all going to die, eventually, and might as well enjoy our mediocre artificially flavored hot drink latte

5) Pumpkin-spice latte (hyphen added to denote that it contains spices designed to emulate the idea of how pumpkin tastes, and not both pumpkin and spices)

Any other suggestions, dear readers? There are several very tasty-looking pumpkin spice latte recipes available online that contain real pumpkin and other non-gross ingredients. You could make those and feel especially zen as you cavort among the leaves as they change shades. Or, like me, you can just continue guiltily ordering Starbucks’ bogus ass drink because you’re lazy and it does, objectively, taste delicious. Whether or not you’re jumping ship, we should all agree on one thing: the thing needs to be called by its true `name.

Image credit: Jeff Wilcox/Flickr (CC BY 2.0)

Source Article from http://feeds.gawker.com/~r/gizmodo/full/~3/o1qOwHLnPGw/+megneal

JPMorgan and other US banks reportedly hit by cyberattack

A Bloomberg report claims that JPMorgan Chase and “at least” four more banks in the US have been victims of a virtual attack from hackers. The data gathered from the breach could reportedly “be used to drain accounts,” according to two Bloomberg sources who have been briefed on the situation by the US government. At the moment, it is unknown which other banks were affected by this, but the FBI has already opened an investigation and is currently working to find out more details. “[We are] working with the United States Secret Service to determine the scope of recently reported cyberattacks against several American financial institutions,” said the FBI in a statement. Meanwhile, a different report from CNN Money notes that seven of the “top” 15 banks were on the wrong end of these attacks, per people familiar with the matter — though such information has not been corroborated by US officials.

“Companies our size unfortunately experience cyberattacks nearly every day. We have multiple layers of defense to counteract any threats and constantly monitor fraud levels,” explained a JPMorgan spokesperson, adding that the bank hasn’t yet detected any sort of unusual fraud activity. Regardless, there are still a lot of unanswered questions right now, but we’ll keep you updated as additional details come to light.













Source Article from http://www.engadget.com/2014/08/28/jpmorgan-us-banks-cyberattack/?ncid=rss_truncated

Stupid Security In A Security System

alarm

[Yaehob]‘s parents have a security system in their house, and when they wanted to make a few changes to their alarm rules – not arming the bathroom at night – an installer would come out, plug a box into the main panel, press a few buttons, and charge 150 €. Horrified at the aspect of spending that much money to flip a few bits, [yaehob] set out to get around the homeowner lockout on the alarm system, and found security where he wasn’t expecting.

Opening the main panel for the alarm system, [yaehob] was greeted with a screeching noise. This was the obvious in retrospect tamper-evident seal on the alarm box, easily silenced by entering a code on the keypad. The alarm, however, would not arm anymore, making the task of getting ‘installer-level’ access on the alarm system a top priority.

After finding a DE-9 serial port on the main board, [yaehob] went to the manufacturer’s website thinking he could download some software. The website does have the software available, but only for authorized distributors, installers, and resellers. You can register as one, though, and no, there is no verification the person filling out a web form is actually a distributor, installer, or reseller.dist

Looking at the installer and accompanying documentation, [yaehob] could see everything, but could not modify anything. To do that would require the installer password, which, according to the documentation was between four and six characters. The system also responded quickly, so brute force was obviously the answer here.

After writing up a quick script to go through all the possible passwords, [yaehob] started plugging numbers into the controller board. Coming back a bit later, he noticed something familiar about what was returned when the system finally let him in. A quick peek at where his brute force app confirmed his suspicions; the installer’s code was his postal code.

From the installer’s point of view, this somewhat makes sense. Any tech driving out to punch a few numbers into a computer and charge $200 will always know the postal code of where he’s driving to. From a security standpoint, holy crap this is bad.

Now that [yaehob]‘s parents are out from under the thumb of the alarm installer, he’s also tacked on a little bit of security of his own; the installer’s code won’t work anymore. It’s now changed to the house number.

Source Article from http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/hackaday/LgoM/~3/BKnMvklwW0A/

Olympus E-PL7: Great Imaging Guts, Now With a Slick Selfie Redesign

Olympus E-PL7: Great Imaging Guts, Now With a Slick Selfie Redesign

Olympus interchangeable-lens cameras are some of the best out there, and that doesn’t change with the new Pen E-PL7. As with the E-PL5, you get amazing imaging tech crammed inside a very small body. Surprisingly the selfie-friendly LCD screen—usually an eye-roller—is so well-conceived that it’s the defining feature of the new camera. And maybe that’s disappointing for a shooter from such a storied mirrorless pedigree.

Many of the Olympus mirrorless cameras share guts, and the E-PL7 follows that trend. The E-PL7 inherits its 16-megapixel micro four thirds sensor and TruePic VII image processor from the dope OM-D line, and while the three-axis image stabilization isn’t the finest vibration control the company makes, it’s way ahead of other cameras at this price point, letting you shoot at slow shutter speeds as if time didn’t exist. In terms of basic shooting specs, though, not much has changed from the last generation of the camera, the E-PL5.

We’re not used to being impressed by a camera’s 180-degree tiling LCD designed for selfies. The feature has been making its way to every consumer camera out there. from bottom feeders to enthusiast cameras that cost almost a thousand bucks. But it’s actually really smart that the Olympus screen flips downwards. As the company points out, it leads to lower angle selfies that look more natural. When the screen flips 180 degrees up as on Sony mirrorless cameras and the new RX100 III, you end up tilting the camera forward towards your faces so you can see the photo you’re taking. This leads to unnatural photos where your arm or raised shoulder is part of the shot. Olympus argues that when if flips down, you’re more likely to get an eye-level shot with your shoulder and arms in what appears to be their resting position. Clever!

And maybe it’s not fair to expect too much from a tiny Olympus shooter. The company has been focusing its energy on larger mirrorless cameras like the O-MD E-M1 (which rules), and it got the compact mirrorless/micro four thirds concept right maybe before anyone. There’s only so much you can do with such a small body.

The Olympus E-PL7 will be available for $600 for the body alone or $700 bundled with a 14-42mm f/3.5-5.6.

Source Article from http://feeds.gawker.com/~r/gizmodo/full/~3/F0o-mOKZhmY/olympus-e-pl7-great-imaging-guts-with-a-slick-selfie-1627805346

3D Printing a Beautiful Prosthetic Hand for a Stranger

3D Printed Prosthetic Hand

Here’s a story that made us feel all warm and tingly on the inside. [Evan Kuester] is currently studying his Masters in Architecture with a specialty in digital fabrication. His program has access to some nice 3D printers, and he was itching for a good project to use them for. Why not a 3D printed prosthetic hand?

He got the idea after noticing a fellow student on campus who was missing her left hand, and did not have any kind of prosthetic. Eventually he worked up the nerve to introduce himself to her and explain his crazy idea. She thought it was brilliant.

Using Rhino, [Evan] began modeling the prosthetic hand using a plugin called Grashopper. He wanted the hand to be functional as well as aesthetically pleasing, so he spent quite a while working with [Ivania] to make it just right. His first prototype, the Ivania 1.0 wasn’t quite what he imagined, so he redesigned it to what you see above. It’s a beautiful mixture of engineering and art, but unfortunately the fingers don’t move — perhaps an improvement for version 3.0? Regardless of functionality, [Ivania] loves it.

Oh, and [Evan] and [Ivania] are close friends now — in case you were wondering.

[via Make]

Source Article from http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/hackaday/LgoM/~3/lbqdly41O0M/

10 Incredibly Dangerous Banned Toys

10 Incredibly Dangerous Banned Toys

They say that it’s all fun and games until somebody loses an eye. Technically, the same applies to skull fractures, poisoning, and third-degree burns. Throughout history, toy makers have designed some truly brutal products (lawn darts, anyone?). But with modern-day lawsuits, you’d think we would’ve curbed that problem. Yet, in their fervor to create the next Slinky, Etch A Sketch, or Tickle Me Elmo, toy manufacturers continue to put dangerous product designs on the market.

In the notorious examples listed here, throwing a tantrum to get a toy can quickly turn into convulsing from its unintended effects. Some of these banned toys were the result of oversights. Others are so glaringly dangerous that it’s a wonder they were ever put into children’s hands in the first place.


10. Slap Bracelets

10 Incredibly Dangerous Banned Toys

Photo credit: Hey Paul Studios

Snap bracelets are spring-loaded metal bands wrapped in colorfully designed plastic or cloth. They can be straightened out until rigid and then slapped against a wrist, causing the bracelet to curl into place. The popular wearable toy fad of snap (or slap) bracelets reached a head around 1990. Like many toy fads, they were very popular in schools. You’d think children would grow tired of repeatedly slapping tacky leopard print or hot pink wrist-wear across their arms, but you’d be wrong.

Unfortunately, it didn’t take much for the more cheaply made versions of the toy (which retailed for under a dollar) to start causing major problems. They’d slice into children’s tender flesh when the metal band inevitably wore through its covering. Some schools banned the bracelets. The knockoff versions were investigated nationwide and recalled in droves. But they made a resurgence in 2012 when certain animal-themed designs were recalled for exactly the same reason.


9. Monster Science Colossal Water Balls

10 Incredibly Dangerous Banned Toys

Remember those tiny little capsules that promised to magically grow into giant dinosaurs like the ones on the package? When dunked in water, those capsules would only transform into lumpy, vaguely dinosaur-shaped disappointment. Now what if we told that child version of you that there was a marble-sized ball that, when wet, could literally grow to 400 times its original size? Fun, huh? Now imagine that these colorful marble-sized balls somehow made it down into your small intestine.

Such a scenario was posed by Monster Science Colossal Water Balls. Naturally, many a whippersnapper ingested the delicious-looking toys, which their genius designers made capable of expanding within a child’s body. Woe be to those who also choked down the ominously labeled “Growth Powder.” From there they caused life-threatening episodes of vomiting and dehydration. To top it all off, these things were impossible to X-ray and required surgery to remove.


8. Aqua Dots

10 Incredibly Dangerous Banned Toys

As our last entry proved, it’s no secret that little kids like to put random stuff in their mouths. With this in mind, non-toxicity should be a pillar of any good toy. That’s not always the case. There are lapses in judgment that include slightly toxic paints or plastics, and then there’s making a product out of a substance that, when eaten, turns into a date rape drug.

When arranged into designs and then sprayed with water, Aqua Dots “magically” locked these colorfully arranged designs into place. The bad news was that kiddos could also suffer respiratory depression, be rendered comatose, or suffer seizures from the severely toxic chemical used to make them. Over four million units were recalled when it was determined that “magical” beads weren’t worth all the comas. One kid was even hospitalized for five days.

Eventually, Spin Master, the maker of Aqua Dots, was revealed to have known that their product contained a controlled substance. After multiple reports of life-threatening effects on children (and, in one case, a dog), Spin Master was forced to pay out over $1.3 million in “magical” fines.


7. Kite Tube

Nope, emblazoning your highly dangerous airborne equipment with a skull and crossbones and the slogan “Never kite higher than you are willing to fall” will not prevent your product from being banned. The Wego Kite Tube experienced such a fate. That’ll happen when two people die and dozens of others are severely injured (including a broken neck and punctured lung).

The Kite Tube, which was three meters (10 ft) wide, allowed a boat-pulled rider to yank a cord in order to glide into the air. Unfortunately, once riders were airborne they were given little control over the flying tube. Admittedly, a parasail mixed with an inner tube sounds pretty amazing. But unfortunately, with only stirrups and hand grips to keep you from falling, flying to the height of a three-story building probably wasn’t the best idea. Kids weren’t the only ones impacted by this incredibly dangerous toy.

At least the recall came more or less voluntarily. The company responsible claimed that there was no way to determine the actual cause of accidents, but that they would recall the tubes “out of an abundance of caution.”


6. Cabbage Patch Snacktime Kids Dolls

10 Incredibly Dangerous Banned Toys

Photo credit: Blippee.com

Remember those Garbage Pail Kids trading cards that grossed out parents in the ’80s? They had nothing on actual Cabbage Patch Kids dolls that seemed to develop a taste for children. The Snacktime Kids doll involved a motorized mouth mechanism that allowed the doll to “eat” plastic foods. Kids being kids, it didn’t take much for fingers and hair to get trapped in those evil dolls’ unforgiving maws. While such a doll wasn’t exactly life threatening, parents unsurprisingly didn’t like their kids’ favorite new pals pulling their hair out by the roots.

The most charming aspect of these terrifying eating machines was that they were made without any on/off switch. In at least one instance, this led to a girl virtually being scalped all along the backside of her head. Mattel may not have identified any obvious hazard in theirs tests, but thankfully that didn’t stop them from pulling the dolls from store shelves. Unfortunately, Cabbage Patch Snacktime Kids dolls are still available in your nightmares.


5. Buckyballs

10 Incredibly Dangerous Banned Toys

Photo credit: Visitor7

Desk toys are obviously marketed toward a slightly more mature audience. But that doesn’t mean they’re guaranteed to keep kids away from the surgeon’s knife. Buckyballs were “super strong” magnetic ball bearings that could be used to construct creative desk sculptures or even “to play ‘darts’ on your refrigerator.” While that part was true, the whole “stress reliever” marketing angle proved far more ironic. Unfortunately, these round magnets slid easily down youngsters’ gullets.

When multiple magnets were swallowed, they had the nasty tendency to clamp togetherthrough intestinal walls and not let go. This could lead to tears in organs, blood poisoning, bowel blockages, and possible death. Due to the large number of balls in each set, it was also difficult for parents to notice when a handful of them may have gone missing inside Junior. And accidental ingestion wasn’t limited just to the tykes, either—teenagers routinely played around with them to mimic tongue and lip piercings.

The government ultimately deemed Buckyballs a danger to consumers. But unlike the 1,000 or so children who required surgery to remove their product, the Buckyballs manufacturer didn’t take that lying down. In fact, they refused to voluntarily recall their product, forcing the feds to sue. When the inventor dissolved his company rather than fund a recall, the government came after him personally in an effort to collect the $57 million in costs. After a bunch of posturing on both sides of the argument, the inventor settled for about 1 percent of that figure. One thing’s for sure—the guy had balls made of steel.


4. CSI Fingerprint Examination Kit

10 Incredibly Dangerous Banned Toys

Photo credit: eBay.com

While there’s something a little grim about children playing with toy forensic investigation kits meant to mimic the collection of evidence at a murder scene, at least it’s just for fun. After all, kids have come up with some pretty twisted forms of play since time immemorial. Marketed off the popular CBS crime show, CSI Fingerprint Examination Kits allowed kids to snap on the latex gloves and collect incriminating play evidence, most notably by dusting for fingerprints. Unfortunately, the fingerprint dust that came with the kit also contained a real-life occupational hazard—one of the deadliest forms of asbestos.

In fact, the fingerprint powder was found to contain up to 7 percent asbestos, the variety of which has been proven to be capable of causing lung cancer later in life from only a single exposure. So what about the kids slathering the stuff on everything from doorknobs to the cookie jar and then blowing the dust in the air? You don’t need to be David Caruso to deduce that it’s not a good idea. Not surprisingly, the toy manufacturer responsible for this product went bankrupt.


3. Splash Off Water Rockets

10 Incredibly Dangerous Banned Toys

Remember earlier in this list when all those kids ate date rape drug-covered toys and ended up in comas? Remember how their manufacturer had to shell out $1.3 million because they knew about the danger but did nothing? Well, Spin Master already had plenty of other awful toy ideas long before that. Besides their toy airplanes that managed to burn users, or the other toy airplanes that broke apart mid-air, in the late ’90s they even made a toy rocket that could explode. Just like the real dangers of space travel!

The Splash Off Water Rocket used water pressure from a hose to build up energy until kiddos and hobbyists could stomp on the launcher and send the rockets flying. Sadly, at least 37 cases were reported of the rocket exploding from the pressure or otherwise flying off in unpredictable directions, causing lacerations to the hands and face.


2. Aqua Leisure Baby Boats

10 Incredibly Dangerous Banned Toys

Babies love water. They love to splash in it, toddle through it, drink it, and let it loose right in their pants. So for parents intent on setting their babies adrift, the Aqua Leisure Baby Boat was an adorable godsend. Too bad the cheaply made inflatable boats tended to tear rather easily, causing dozens of babies to plunge right through.

Aqua Leisure was ultimately fined $650,000 for knowing about the problem for six years but hiding behind the classic “but-no-babies-have-actually-drowned-yet” justification. Every time they received a series of complaints, they’d tweak their design (along with the name they sold them under) and keep selling them. They went so far as to actually withhold complete information about the defect from the feds, which it turns out is a big no-no.


1. Easy-Bake Ovens

10 Incredibly Dangerous Banned Toys

For some reason, many children through the years haven’t realized that they don’t need to waste their preciously short childhoods baking their own cookies. The popularity of the Easy-Bake Oven, which uses a real heating element to actually bake dessert items, may have reached its apex in 2006. That year, it was voted into the National Toy Hall of Fame. But Hasbro, the makers of the Easy-Bake Oven, didn’t have long to celebrate. A year later they were forced to recall one million of their plastic models when it was discovered that a design flaw allowed the oven to easily trap and severely burn children’s tiny little fingers.

This is obviously a recipe for disaster, especially given that the ovens could reach temperatures of up to 200 degrees Celsius (400 °F). All told, nearly 250 incidents were reported, including 16 cases of second- or third-degree burns. One unlucky five-year-old girl was even forced to undergo a partial finger amputation.


This article has been reposted with permission from Listverse. To read in its entirety, head here. For more from Listverse, you can head here or Like them on Facebook here.

About the author: Josh Goller thinks it’d be nice if the wages of sin would include a cost of living increase every once in a while. He edits the flash fiction lit zine The Molotov Cocktail and will be judging its first ever Flash Monster contest.

Source Article from http://feeds.gawker.com/~r/gizmodo/full/~3/FONIEmcTi44/10-incredibly-dangerous-banned-toys-1627171910

LED Water Wheel Display Is Dekatron-tastic!

led-ring-final

Sometimes, it’s the simple things that mesmerize. [JohnS_AZ] has created a simple dekatron style LED ring, but we can’t seem to stop watching his video. [John's] LED ring began as a visual indicator for his Hackaday Prize entry, a water consumption display. Judging by his website, [John] is a bit of a display nut. Nixie tubes and huge clocks feature prominently.

We’ve seen plenty of LED projects using the trusty 74xx595 8-bit shift register. [John] personally isn’t a fan, as the entire chip is only rated to drive about 50mA. While hackers routinely push the chip several times past this limit, [John] found a chip designed for the task in the Texas Instruments TLC59282 16 channel constant current LED driver. (PDF link) While more expensive than the ‘595, the 59282 makes life much easier. Only one resistor is needed at the chip’s current sense pin, rather than a current-limiting resistor for each LED. The 59282 also provides a blank input, which is perfect for driving with PWM.

[John] designed a simple PCB with a the 59282 driving a ring of 16 LEDs. While he waited for the boards to come in, he wrote some test code for a Microchip PIC16F1509. [John's] code is not optimized, but that makes it easy to see exactly which bit patterns he’s writing to the LEDs. It all makes for a great demo, and reminds us of those old Dekatron tubes.
It’s the demo video that makes this project. Click past the break and give it a watch. After several long days of judging entries, a really nice LED ring might be just what the doctor ordered.

Source Article from http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/hackaday/LgoM/~3/Q0oHEIb1JwU/